Featured Artists

De Petra

Texas-based jewelry studio De Petra draws inspiration from the metalworking techniques of the ancient world, including the city in Jordan after which it is named. Founded in 2008 by sisters Cynthia Sheridan and Lorena Rodriguez, the label is best known for their compelling, feminine pieces crafted from natural stones, colorful leathers and precious metals sourced from around the world.

Anna Collette Hunt

We first spotted the work of 23-year-old ceramicist Anna Collette Hunt at an installation inside of Nottingham Castle, where a swarm of 10,000 insects overtook its South Hall staircase. Pairing opulent details with her peculiar subject matter—sparkling scarabs, bewitching butterflies and other delightful oddities—she creates heirloom-quality homewares that never fail to catch our eye.

Ruan Hoffmann

We first fell in love with the works of South African artist Ruan Hoffmann in 2011 when he was featured in our Rockefeller Center store gallery. A veritable master at combining traditional craftsmanship with modern art, the Johannesburg artist continues to span the surfaces of everything from ceramics to paper goods with untamed botany and one-word affirmations.

Dirk Vander Kooij

While in Milan, we came across the works of Dutch artist Dirk Vander Kooij, who sculpts contemporary homewares from his studio in Northern Holland. The artist's work, much like the 3-D printing process he uses, is coolly precise and cutting-edge. In fact, he was the first ever designer to transform melted remnants from recycled refrigerators into furniture using modern software—a feat that marked the advent of a new design technology.

Florence Balducci

Though technically an illustrator and designer by trade, we consider Parisian artist Florence Balducci to be a professional visionary. Her whimsical works of art recall her lifelong love of literature, composition and fashion, while suggesting a magpie's eye for all things charming and peculiar—sketches of exotic wing-backed creatures and mystical hot air balloons come to mind.

Back to Top